Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Adding Footnotes to Endnotes.

Adding Footnotes to Endnotes

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 25, 2013)

Peter notes that he is working on a document that has both extensive footnotes and endnotes. He has a need to add additional footnotes to his existing endnotes, but he can't find a way to do it.

The reason you can't find a way to do it is because there is no way to do it in Word. Footnotes and endnotes are singular in nature, meaning that you can have one set of footnotes and one set of endnotes per document; that's it. (Endnotes can be placed in different places in a document—the end of a section or the end of the document—but there is still only one set.) You can't add notes within notes, which is what would be required if you wanted to footnote your endnotes.

In addition, all of the style guides we've been able to locate indicate that your endnotes should not have their own footnotes. In most cases, you should simply incorporate the footnote material within the endnote to which it applies. Many people do this by having an endnote contain multiple paragraphs, which is perfectly legal in Word.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (7692) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Adding Footnotes to Endnotes.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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