Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Printing Very Large Paper Sizes.

Printing Very Large Paper Sizes

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 25, 2015)

Word allows you to print on a wide variety of paper sizes. You cannot use an unlimited paper size, however. For instance, it does very little good to try printing a poster-size document on a plotter, simply because Word won't support documents that large.

Word is hard-coded to permit document widths and heights as small as .1 inches and as large as 22 inches. Thus, the largest page area you can define in Word is 22 inches by 22 inches. This is an absolute limit. If you need to print to larger paper, then you will need to use a different program, such as a desktop publishing program.

There is one other caveat to keep in mind, however. The paper size to which you can print may also be limited in some way by your printer driver. For instance, if your printer driver will only handle paper up to 18 inches in width, then it won't matter that Word can handle up to 22-inch wide paper. If you find that your printer driver is limiting what you can print, you should check with the manufacturer to see if a newer printer driver is available.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1026) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Printing Very Large Paper Sizes.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Controlling Sorting Order

When you sort information either in a table or the body of you document, Word follows a very specific set of rules to do the ...

Discover More

Handling Leading Zeros in CSV Files

When dealing with files containing comma-separated values, you want to make sure that what gets imported into Excel reflects ...

Discover More

Nudging a Table

When laying out a page, you often need to move objects around to get them into just the right position. Word allows you to ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

MORE WORDTIPS (MENU)

Removing Comment Brackets for Printing

How to remove the brackets indicating commented text before printing your Word document.

Discover More

Guidelines for Laser Printer Letterhead

Plan on using printed letterhead in your laser printer? Here are some tips and cautions about doing so.

Discover More

Printing Reversed Images

Ever need to print the mirror image of your document? This tip explains how to reverse your image so it can be used for ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share