Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Copying Found Items to a New Document.

Copying Found Items to a New Document

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 29, 2012)

2

Robert notes that Word allows him to locate and highlight all the instances of an item that he enters in the Find dialog box. He wonders if, from that point, there is some way he can select all the highlighted instances so that he can copy and paste them into a new document.

Copying individual items that are found is easy?all you need to do is have the source and target documents open, find what you want in the source document, copy it to the Clipboard, and then paste it into the target document. Copying a bunch of found items at once is a bit trickier, however. Here's how to do it:

  1. Make sure you have the source and target documents both open, with the source document active.
  2. Press Ctrl+F. Word displays the Find tab of the Find and Replace dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Find tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  4. In the Find What box enter what you want to search for.
  5. Set any other parameters you desire for your search.
  6. Make sure the Highlight All Items Found In check box is selected. (The drop-down list under the check box should be set to Main Document.)
  7. Click Find All. (If you don't see a Find All button, it means you didn't perform step 5.) Word selects all the matches it found.
  8. Click the title bar of your source document. This moves focus from the Find and Replace dialog box to the document itself, and all the selected items remain selected.
  9. Press Ctrl+C. This copies all the selected items to the Clipboard.
  10. Switch to the target document.
  11. Press Ctrl+V. Word pastes the Clipboard contents (all the matched information) into the target document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (3850) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Copying Found Items to a New Document.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is three minus 2?

2015-04-11 18:37:18

Mike

I'm having the same problem as Robert (comment on 03 Feb 2013). I'm working on Mac 2011 v 14.4.8
When I find all, the select, copy and paste the selection, Word pastes the clipboard contents out of order: "1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7" pastes as "7, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 1"
Any help?
Thanks!


2013-02-03 12:32:30

Robert

I am having a strange problem with the 'copy all' after highlighting from the FIND dialogue in Word 2007. Here is what I am doing:
--I have dis-contiguous highlighted items in Word document.
--In find box, I click 'Highlighted' under 'format'.
--I click 'Find in'/'Main document' and the number of highlighted items appears in FIND box and items are selected in document
--I close find box, go to document and key 'ctrl-c' to get contents on clipboard.
--I go to new document and paste the clipboard, and everything that was highlighted in the first doc is there... BUT... IN REVERSE ORDER!

I have tried changing search parameters (search UP, DOWN, ALL) and cursor position in doc before I do the highlight search, but nothing changes - the pasted version is still reversed.
Any suggestions???


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