Adding a Macro to a Toolbar

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 12, 2013)

Word is a very flexible program. You can configure it to work just about any way you can imagine. For instance, you can create a macro, and then add it to a toolbar. How you do this depends on which version of Word you are using.

If you are using a version of Word prior to Word 2007, then follow these steps:

  1. Choose Customize from the Tools menu. Word displays the Customize dialog box.
  2. Make sure the Toolbars tab is selected. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Toolbars tab of the Customize dialog box.

  4. In the list of toolbars, make sure there is a check mark beside the toolbar to which you want your macro added. The check mark ensures that the toolbar is displayed on the screen.
  5. Click on the Commands tab.
  6. In the list of Categories, choose the Macros entry. Your macros should then appear in the Commands list.
  7. In the Commands list, select the macro you want assigned to a toolbar.
  8. Using the mouse, drag the macro from the Commands list to the location on the toolbar where you want it to appear.
  9. When you drop the macro, it appears on the toolbar.
  10. To add more macros, repeat steps 6 through 8.
  11. Click on Close.

Word 2007 is different; it doesn't technically have toolbars like older versions of Word had. You can't make additions or changes to the ribbon, but you can add macros to the Quick Access toolbar. Follow these steps:

  1. Click the Office button and then click Word Options. Word displays the Word Options dialog box.
  2. At the left side of the dialog box, click the Customize option.
  3. Using the Choose Commands From drop-down list, choose Macros.
  4. In the list of available macros, select the one you want assigned to the Quick Access toolbar.
  5. Click the Add button. The command now appears at the right side of the dialog box.
  6. Click the OK button. The command now appears on the Quick Access toolbar.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1879) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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