Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Finding and Changing Word's Internal Commands.

Finding and Changing Word's Internal Commands

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 30, 2016)

When you are developing macros, you may want to replace one of the built-in commands used by Word with your own macro code. In order to do this, you must find out the name used by Word to refer to the built-in commands. You can do so by following these steps:

  1. Choose the Macro option from the Tools menu, then choose the Macros option from the resulting submenu. Word displays the Macros dialog box.
  2. Using the Macros In drop-down list, select Word Commands. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Macros dialog box.

  4. Using the command list, locate and select the command you want to edit. Once selected, the name should appear not only in the list of commands, but also in the Macro Name box at the top of the dialog box.

Now, if you want to change the command, continue on with the rest of these steps:

  1. Using the Macros In drop-down list, select where you want your edited command to appear. The command name should still appear in the Macro Name box at the top of the dialog box.
  2. Click on Create. Word starts the VBA Editor and shows the program instructions that make up the built-in command.
  3. Make your changes to the command.
  4. Close the Editor window by clicking on the Close icon in the upper-right corner of the window.
  5. Save your changes, if prompted.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1509) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Finding and Changing Word's Internal Commands.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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