Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Converting Text to Uppercase in a Macro.

Converting Text to Uppercase in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 8, 2012)

2

There are two ways you can convert text to uppercase in Word, within a macro. The first is to use the AllCaps property and the second is to use the Case property. The following shows how to use both methods.

Selection.Font.AllCaps = True
Selection.Range.Case = wdUpperCase

Both of these statements assume you have selected the text to be changed prior to issuing the statements. The difference between them is that the AllCaps property controls only the formatting of the text—it only appears as uppercase. The Case property, on the other hand, actually changes the letters in the selection so they are uppercase.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1723) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Converting Text to Uppercase in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Turning Off Highlighter Display

You can use the highlighter tool to add all sorts of color to your document. If you want to turn off those colors so that ...

Discover More

Problem with Missing Context Menu Option

When you right-click a cell, does it seem that the Context menu is missing an item or two? Here's how to get those items ...

Discover More

Colors and Fonts for Worksheet Tabs

Changing the color used on a worksheet tab is easy. Just follow the three steps in this tip.

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More WordTips (menu)

Toggling Font Assignments in a Macro

If you need to quickly switch a text selection from one typeface to another, one way you can do it is with a macro. This tip ...

Discover More

Automatically Inserting Tomorrow's Date

Do you routinely need to work with tomorrow's date? Why not create a template that automatically adds tomorrow's date to any ...

Discover More

Options in Creating New Files

You'd think that Word would be consistent, right? Wrong! Here's one example where Word is anything but consistent when it ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 4 - 3?

2017-08-08 09:26:55

John Davidson

Later ... I tried:

Sub Test()
Dim sFont As String

sFont = Selection.Font.Name
Selection.Range.Case = wdNextCase
Selection.Font.Name = sFont
End Sub

But changing the font in this way doesn't change the SimSun font back again to the original font. If I do it manually, the font is changed but not using VBA.

Any thoughts anyone?


2017-08-08 07:06:14

John Davidson

Use of Word's Change Case command or using VBA's 'Selection.Range.Case = wdLowerCase' or 'Selection.Range.Case = wdNextCase' changes the font of some diacritical characters to SimSun

For instance, try changing the case of dǎoyǐn.

Is there a way to prevent Word from doing this? The only way I can think of is to turn the ChangeCase command into a VBA routine that checks the font of the selected text and resets it after changing the case.


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.