Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Dissecting a String.

Dissecting a String

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 9, 2014)

If you have used BASIC before, you will be right at home with the string functions provided by VBA. The following table details the most common string functions and what they return.

Function Comments
Left(Source, Count) Returns the left Count characters of Source.
Mid(Source, Start [, Count]) Returns the portion of Source beginning with the Start character. If Count is supplied, then the result is limited to that many characters.
Right(Source, Count) Returns the right Count characters of Source.

When working with these string functions, remember that the Source variable must be declared as a string in order for the functions to work properly.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1073) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Dissecting a String.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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