Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Endnotes in a Separate Document.

Endnotes in a Separate Document

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 21, 2013)

Ingrid has a document that has many, many endnotes in it. She would like to place the endnotes in a separate document and still maintain the numbering.

There is no straightforward way to do this in Word. There are a couple of things you can try, however, that may fit your needs. First, you could try to copy the endnotes (just select them and press Ctrl+C) and then paste them into a new document. They won't be numbered, but you could number them easily enough by simply formatted them as a numbered list. The list should have the same numbers as was used in the original document.

The drawback to this approach, of course, is that the endnotes are still in your original document as well as in the new document, and any changes to the endnotes in the original document will not be reflected in the new document.

Another option (and perhaps the best) is to go with a third-party add-on for Word. One that comes highly recommended is NoteStripper, which you can find here:

http://www.editorium.com/15078.htm

The program allows you to convert Word's endnotes to straight text so that you can then put them into their own document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (5395) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Endnotes in a Separate Document.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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