Different Table Captions on Multiple Pages

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 15, 2016)

1

Chuck has some long tables in his documents, and he would like the table caption to be different for the second and subsequent pages on which the table occurs. For instance, he would like to have the caption on the first page of the table be something like "Table 1 Results" and for the other pages be something like "Table 1 Results (continued)".

The short answer is that Word doesn't allow you to have different captions when the table extends to multiple pages. One obvious solution is to break your table into two—one part for the first page and another for subsequent pages. You could then add multiple captions for the tables. This will only work if your page layout is static (you won't be adding any more text before the table). It can also mess up any "table of tables" that you may add to your document, as you would have two captions for what is essentially the same table.

Another possible workaround is to follow these general steps:

  1. Put the continuation text (such as "continued" within parentheses) into the caption.
  2. Anchor an opaque text box or a drawing rectangle to the paragraph immediately preceding the table and lock the anchor in place. (You need the anchor to remain outside the table, locked to that preceding paragraph.)
  3. Drag the text box or rectangle over the continuation text in the caption and size it to cover only that text. This will hide the text on the first page of the table but not on subsequent pages.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (3417) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Developing Style Families

Styles, as implemented in Word, represent a powerful way to help you easily standardize your formatting tasks. When creating ...

Discover More

Expanding a Custom Dictionary

Does Word tell you that your custom dictionary is full? It might not actually be full, but even if it is you can add another ...

Discover More

Moving Slides

Getting your slides into the order in which you need them is a big part of putting together a presentation. Here are the ways ...

Discover More

The First and Last Word on Word! Bestselling For Dummies author Dan Gookin puts his usual fun and friendly candor back to work to show you how to navigate Word 2013. Spend more time working and less time trying to figure it all out! Check out Word 2013 For Dummies today!

More WordTips (menu)

Keep Your Headings in View

Headings on a table are very important when it comes to understanding what is in the table. This tip explains an easy way you ...

Discover More

Repeating Column Information on Each Page

When your table occupies lots of pages, you may want to have information in a particular column repeated on each page. Word ...

Discover More

Jumping to the Ends of Table Columns

Need a quick shortcut to jump to the top or bottom of a table column? Here are the two shortcuts you are searching for.

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 6 - 0?

2014-06-04 05:18:59

Simon A Watts

The document style standard I am currently working with specifies that captions for tables should be above their table. I can then place the caption in a borderless header row so that it is repeated when the table spans multiple pages.

So, the next step is to have "(continued)" appended to the title for each repeated occurance. What I need is some autotext which evalutates to empty if the current page equals the page where the caption is defined, and "(continued)" otherwise.


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.