Using Callouts

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 28, 2015)

1

If, for some reason, you don't like the Comment feature in Word, one alternative is that you can place comments into your document using callouts. These are special text boxes that have a small "tail" that you can point to different locations on your document. Callouts are most closely related to the thought or speech bubbles you see used in comic strips all the time.

To use callouts in your document, do the following:

  1. If you don't already have the Drawing toolbar displayed, click on the Drawing tool on the Standard toolbar. Word displays the Drawing toolbar at the bottom of the screen.
  2. Click on the AutoShapes tool, move your mouse to Callouts on the resulting menu, and then choose a callout type from those presented. Word switches to Page Layout view and transforms your mouse pointer into a crosshairs.
  3. Click in your document where you want a corner of the callout to appear, and then drag the mouse to the opposite corner. When you release the mouse button, the callout you selected appears over the top of your document.
  4. Type the text you want to appear within the callout.
  5. Click outside the callout to again start working with your regular document.

Once placed in your document, you can move the callout around as necessary using the same techniques you would use with any other graphic object. If it bothers you that the callout appears over the top of existing text (and thereby obscures it), you could make sure that you have larger margins set on the document and then make sure the callout balloons are placed within the margins of the document.

Since it can get tedious to repeatedly place callouts in a document, you may want to copy a blank callout to the Clipboard (select it and press Ctrl+C), from where you can paste it anywhere else you need it in your document (simply press Ctrl+V).

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1721) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Inserting the Template Name in Your Document

Templates are a powerful part of the Word experience, as they allow you to create and format documents based on patterns. ...

Discover More

Converting a Word Document to Docs Format

Many documents start out in Microsoft Word, but you may need to move them to Docs so you can share and collaborate with ...

Discover More

Defining a Word

Need to know what a particular word means? Google Docs includes a built-in dictionary that can make it super easy to find ...

Discover More

Do More in Less Time! Are you ready to harness the full power of Word 2013 to create professional documents? In this comprehensive guide you'll learn the skills and techniques for efficiently building the documents you need for your professional and your personal life. Check out Word 2013 In Depth today!

More WordTips (menu)

Turning On Picture Placeholders

Displaying graphics in a document requires a great deal more computer processing than displaying simple text. A document ...

Discover More

Stopping Text from Jumping Around

Do you struggle with getting your graphics and surrounding text to appear just the way you want it? Here are some ...

Discover More

Grouping Drawing Objects

Drawing objects are easily added to a document. You can group these objects so they are easier to manage by following the ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 5 + 3?

2015-04-12 07:31:58

Gabriel Awe

is there anything called self-portrait in ms word 2013?


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.