Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Printing a Macro List.

Printing a Macro List

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 17, 2014)

3

Many Word users rely upon macros to perform all sorts of tasks in the program. Over the years it is possible to accumulate quite a few different macros. At some point you may want a way to print out a list of your macros for reference purposes. Unfortunately, Word doesn't provide a way you easily print out such a macro list.

If you just need a quick list, one way to do it is to use Word's built-in tools to list all the commands available to Word. Since Word considers macros to be "commands," the command list will also include your macros. But since you don't want all of the other commands in Word (besides your macros), you will need to do a little editing. Follow these steps:

  1. Press Alt+F8. Word displays the Macros dialog box.
  2. Using the Macros In drop-down list, choose Word Commands. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Macros dialog box.

  4. In the list of Word commands, select the ListCommands option.
  5. Click on Run. Word begins to run the macro and displays a dialog box.
  6. Click the All Word Commands radio button.
  7. Click OK.

Word then creates a new document that contains a table with all Word commands. Remember that your macros are buried within the table. To find them, search for "normal" (make sure you include the period, but not the quote marks). This finds any "commands" contained in the Normal document template. You can copy the names of these commands—they are your macros—to a different document. If you have macros in any other templates, search for those template names, as well.

Another approach is to follow these general steps:

  1. If your macros are not in the Normal template, open the template that contains your macros.
  2. Press Alt+F11. Word displays the Visual Basic editor.
  3. Double click a module on the left side, so that the code appears on the right.
  4. Select all the code and press Ctrl+C. This copies the macro code to the Clipboard.
  5. Open a new Word document and paste all the macro code into the document.
  6. Press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document.
  7. Press Ctrl+H. Word displays the Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.
  8. Click the More button if it is available. (See Figure 2.)
  9. Figure 2. The Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  10. Make sure the Use Wildcards check box is selected.
  11. Using the Search drop-down list, choose Up.
  12. In the Find What box, type the following: (Sub*\(\))(*)
  13. In the Replace box, type the following: \1^p
  14. Click Replace All.

What you instructed Word to do was to delete everything except the subroutine names (these are your macro names). What is not included in this process are any functions you may have created in your macros. Those functions are not publicly available macros, so for most people this isn't a big issue.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the WordTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (7423) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Printing a Macro List.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is 5 + 2?

2018-04-05 16:54:38

Allen

Donna,

That is a built-in Word command that, as I recall, pauses the Macro Recorder. It does not actually pause a macro that is running.

-Allen


2018-04-05 16:51:58

Donna Lee M. McGarry

Wow, that list is entirely too long. However, I did print it out for what it's worth. Frankly, Microsoft Word (whatever version) is a poor substitute for Word Perfect if you happen to type for a living. I had over 5,000 macros in Word Perfect and then had to switch to Microsoft Word. Speaking of culture shock along with a production slow down, Microsoft Word sure hit my bottom line.

One thing I noticed when reviewing this list is a word command that says "Pause Recorder." I am truly hoping this means what I think it means, but am asking you to verify this. In Word Perfect I had numerous macros which I referred to as a "Pause Macro," wherein the macro would stop playing, if you will, and allow the typist to fill in a blank, hit enter and the macro would resume running. Several macros I used would pause several times within the run function before completion.

Is this what the word command "Pause Recorder" does? AND how do you interject it while making a macro such that it could possibly perform as the macros I had in Word Perfect did?

It took a while for me to figure it out, but in order to be functional for a transcriptionist I did manage to adapt the "record macro" to be produced with keystrokes and not utilizing the mouse.

I'll be interested in hearing what you say on a "Pause Macro."


2015-06-26 07:09:21

Anand

Sir, I tried to follow Tip (7423). My target is to know the key board key I had assigned to each macro. This procedure helped me getting the names of the macros I had created, but not the command/s I had assigned. Kindly help me to know the command e.g. Alt + 1,1 and similar.
Thanking you for your cooperation in the matter.


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