Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Printing a Macro List.

Printing a Macro List

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 17, 2014)

Many Word users rely upon macros to perform all sorts of tasks in the program. Over the years it is possible to accumulate quite a few different macros. At some point you may want a way to print out a list of your macros for reference purposes. Unfortunately, Word doesn't provide a way you easily print out such a macro list.

If you just need a quick list, one way to do it is to use Word's built-in tools to list all the commands available to Word. Since Word considers macros to be "commands," the command list will also include your macros. But since you don't want all of the other commands in Word (besides your macros), you will need to do a little editing. Follow these steps:

  1. Press Alt+F8. Word displays the Macros dialog box.
  2. Using the Macros In drop-down list, choose Word Commands. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Macros dialog box.

  4. In the list of Word commands, select the ListCommands option.
  5. Click on Run. Word begins to run the macro and displays a dialog box.
  6. Click the All Word Commands radio button.
  7. Click OK.

Word then creates a new document that contains a table with all Word commands. Remember that your macros are buried within the table. To find them, search for "normal" (make sure you include the period, but not the quote marks). This finds any "commands" contained in the Normal document template. You can copy the names of these commands—they are your macros—to a different document. If you have macros in any other templates, search for those template names, as well.

Another approach is to follow these general steps:

  1. If your macros are not in the Normal template, open the template that contains your macros.
  2. Press Alt+F11. Word displays the Visual Basic editor.
  3. Double click a module on the left side, so that the code appears on the right.
  4. Select all the code and press Ctrl+C. This copies the macro code to the Clipboard.
  5. Open a new Word document and paste all the macro code into the document.
  6. Press Ctrl+End to move to the end of the document.
  7. Press Ctrl+H. Word displays the Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.
  8. Click the More button if it is available. (See Figure 2.)
  9. Figure 2. The Replace tab of the Find and Replace dialog box.

  10. Make sure the Use Wildcards check box is selected.
  11. Using the Search drop-down list, choose Up.
  12. In the Find What box, type the following: (Sub*\(\))(*)
  13. In the Replace box, type the following: \1^p
  14. Click Replace All.

What you instructed Word to do was to delete everything except the subroutine names (these are your macro names). What is not included in this process are any functions you may have created in your macros. Those functions are not publicly available macros, so for most people this isn't a big issue.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (7423) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Printing a Macro List.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Sequential Page Numbers Across Worksheets

How do you want your page numbers to appear on your printed worksheets? Chances are good that you want them to be sequential, ...

Discover More

Automatically Using Smart Quotes

As a way to make your documents look more professional, Word can utilize "smart quotes" for both quote marks and apostrophes. ...

Discover More

Bogging Down with Calculated Items

Create a complex PivotTable and you may find that your system slows to a crawl. The reason for this may be due to the way in ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

MORE WORDTIPS (MENU)

Attaching Macros to Documents

When you distribute documents to other people, you may want those documents to have associated macros that the reader can ...

Discover More

Changing a Macro Description

Part of documenting macros is to provide a good, succinct description of what they do. Changing the description of an ...

Discover More

Disabled Macros

Did you recently upgrade from Word 97 to a later version of Word, only to find that your macros no longer work? Here's the ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share