Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Removing Confusion When Using AutoCorrect.

Removing Confusion When Using AutoCorrect

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 28, 2015)

2

I find the AutoCorrect feature very useful and have added extensive words and phrases to make it easier for me to type my business letters. This has led to some amusing situations. One of my employees was typing a newsletter for his baseball team. He used the word "bat" and "bats" a number of times. My business is batteries, and these are abbreviations that I set up to AutoCorrect to "battery" and "batteries". When he typed out the newsletter, he had no idea where all these words had come from. I have some other words such as "options" that insert about half a page of text. Typing my initials inserts "Yours truly," three blank lines, and then my full name and title.

To avoid confusion when using AutoCorrect (such as my employee experienced), I now append an asterisk to the end of the AutoCorrect keyword. Thus, I use "bat*" and "bats*" instead of "bat" and "bats." With no asterisk, I just get the word as it is typed. The asterisk triggers the use of the AutoCorrect feature and inserts the full text.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (887) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Removing Confusion When Using AutoCorrect.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Finding Odd Values Greater Than 50

If you have a special need to find cell values that meet two different criteria, where to start can be daunting. This tip can ...

Discover More

Combining Documents

Need to combine quite a few text documents? A macro may be the easiest way to stuff them all into a single Word document.

Discover More

Spell-Check Won't Work

Having problems making spell check work on a portion of your document? There are two primary causes for such an occurrence, ...

Discover More

Do More in Less Time! Are you ready to harness the full power of Word 2013 to create professional documents? In this comprehensive guide you'll learn the skills and techniques for efficiently building the documents you need for your professional and your personal life. Check out Word 2013 In Depth today!

MORE WORDTIPS (MENU)

Importing AutoCorrect Entries

The AutoCorrect feature in Word is quite handy, but getting a lot of entries into the feature can be tedious. This tip ...

Discover More

Enforcing a Do-Not-Use Word List

Got a list of words you don't want to appear in your documents? There are a number of ways that you can make sure they don't, ...

Discover More

Shortcut for AutoCorrect Dialog Box

There is no built-in keyboard shortcut that will display the AutoCorrect dialog box. This doesn't mean that there aren't a ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is nine more than 2?

2015-11-30 18:17:28

Steve Wells

Chuck,
Use AutoCorrect.dot, a template that includes a macro to save and restore AutoCorrect settings. You can find it at: http://www.word.mvps.org/Downloads/index.htm
The macro inside the template saves a table of your custom AutoCorrect entries into a Word document. That document and its table are very easy for human review and editing. You can add more rows and create new entries directly, or modify/delete rows as desired. The AutoCorrect.dot macro can also restore the entries from your document table, or from any desired variant that you saved to a useful name/location.
Thus you can restore (copy) to a new computer or update the settings on an alternate computer. For example, I have home and work versions with obvious names: AutoCorrectHomeRestoreTable.doc and AutoCorrectWorkRestoreTable.doc. I apply colors to entries that I would prefer to remove if I copy from one file to the other. The macro doesn’t care about color, font, headers, or footers. So I can keep nearly identical versions synched, yet with slight differences.


2015-11-28 04:22:25

Chuck Haber

Thanks for the great AutoCorrect tip. I, too, have had this amusing problem & your tip will help me.
I also wonder if it is possible to import all of my AutoCorrect entries to a new computer -- or if I have to manually type them in all over again to set them up?


Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share