Starting a Discussion

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 7, 2014)

Word 2000 and later versions include an online collaboration feature called discussions. After you have connected to a discussion server (as described in previous WordTips), you can load a document and start either an inline or general discussion. You use an inline discussion to trade comments on a specific part of a document, such as a paragraph, table, graphic, or other element. To start an inline discussion, follow these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point anywhere within the paragraph or table that will be the subject of the discussion.
  2. On the Discussions toolbar, click on the Insert Discussion In the Document tool. The Enter Discussion Text dialog box appears.
  3. In the Discussion Subject area, enter the subject for your discussion.
  4. In the Discussion Text area, enter your comments.
  5. Click on OK.

Your comment is posted on the server, and Word places the discussion icon at the end of the paragraph, table, or graphic. In addition, Word displays the Discussion pane at the bottom of your screen.

You can use a general discussion to discuss global issues concerning a document. To start a general discussion, follow these steps:

  1. Open the document you want to discuss.
  2. On the Discussions toolbar, click on the Insert Discussion About the Document tool. The Enter Discussion Text dialog box appears.
  3. In the Discussion Subject area, enter the subject for your discussion.
  4. In the Discussion Text area, enter your comments.
  5. Click on OK.

Your comment is posted on the server, and the discussion icon appears at the end of the paragraph, table, or graphic. In addition, Word displays the Discussion pane at the bottom of your screen.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (772) applies to Microsoft Word 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Can't Empty the Clipboard

The Clipboard is essential to move or copy information from one place in Excel to another. If you get an error when you try ...

Discover More

Using Multiple References to a Single Comment

Find yourself repeating the same comment over and over? Here's a couple of ways you can save some typing by simply referring ...

Discover More

Increasing Envelope Address Lines

Envelopes in Word are created through the use of styles that define specific elements of the envelope, such as return address ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

MORE WORDTIPS (MENU)

Automatic Scrolling

Spend a lot of time scrolling around in your document? You might find one of Word's hidden scrolling commands to be a nice ...

Discover More

Can't Place Merge Field in Header Of a Catalog Merge Document

Word can perform several different types of mail merge operations, and the type you choose can affect how you are able to use ...

Discover More

Creating an Executive Summary

Word includes an "executive summary" tool that allows you to automatically summarize a document. This tool provides a great ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share