Changing Borders for Data Series

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 16, 2013)

When Microsoft Graph charts your data, it normally surrounds the graphical representation of that data with a border. This is typically a thin black line, but you can change both the line color and line weight used to create this border. To do this, follow these steps:

  1. Select a data series by clicking on the graphical representation of that series. For instance, if your data is displayed as a column chart, click on the column that represents the series whose border you wish to turn off.
  2. Choose Selected Data Series from the Format menu. Microsoft Graph displays the Format Data Series dialog box. The Patterns tab should be selected. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Patterns tab of the Format Data Series dialog box.

  4. In the Border area, use the Style drop-down list to select the type of line you want to use for the border.
  5. In the Border area, select the color you want applied to the border using the Color drop-down list.
  6. In the Border area, use the Weight drop-down list to select the line weight you wish to use for the border (you can select from four line weights).
  7. Click on OK.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (718) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Functioning Check Boxes in a Protected Worksheet

Want to protect a worksheet but maintain the ability to make changes to the check boxes you add to the worksheet? Here is ...

Discover More

Advanced Filtering

Many people know how to use AutoFilter, but there are times when you need some more filtering muscle. Here's how you can use ...

Discover More

Running a Macro in a Number of Workbooks

Got a macro that you need to run on each of a number of workbooks? Excel provides a number of ways to go about this task, as ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

MORE WORDTIPS (MENU)

Displaying a Chart Legend

A legend can help explain the various lines or objects visible in a chart. Microsoft Chart allows you to turn on or off the ...

Discover More

Inserting Datasheet Rows or Columns

Microsoft Graph provides a handy way to add simple charts to your document without the need for Excel. Those charts are based ...

Discover More

Importing Excel Information Into Chart

Microsoft Graph is great for displaying charts in a document, without the need to actually use Excel. However, your data may ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share