Saving in PostScript Format

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 27, 2013)

There may be times when you need to output a Word document in a special format. For instance, you may need to send a document to a printer or to an outside service bureau, and they require the document in PostScript format instead of Word's native document format.

PostScript, of course, is a page description language used by printers and other output devices. It is not a format in which you would normally save your document. For this reason, you can't choose Save As and select PostScript as a file type. Instead, you need to print your document to a file using a PostScript printer driver.

The key here, of course, is to make sure you have a PostScript printer driver installed on your system. Check with the people requiring your file in PostScript format, asking them which printer driver you should use. You can then install that printer driver within Windows, and you are ready to follow these steps within Word:

  1. Load the document you need in PostScript format.
  2. Choose Print from the File menu. Word displays the Print dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Print dialog box

  4. Use the drop-down Name field to select the printer driver you want to use for making the PostScript file.
  5. Make sure the Print to File check box is selected.
  6. Click on OK. You are asked to provide a filename for the output.
  7. Enter a filename, including a path if desired.
  8. Click on OK.

Now you can quit Word, locate the file you specified in step 6, and copy or e-mail the file for use by the outside party.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (561) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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