Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Displaying Blanks when Summing to Zero.

Displaying Blanks when Summing to Zero

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 21, 2016)

1

When you are working with tables in Word, you can use a field to sum the values in a range of cells or in an entire column. Normally, if the sum of the range is zero, the field displays a 0—this seems reasonable. You may, however, want the field to display a blank when the sum is zero, instead of the actual number 0.

To do this, simply modify your sum formula as follows:

{ =SUM(ABOVE) \# #;-#; }

Notice the addition of several parameters after the SUM formula. The first (\#) is known as a numeric picture field switch. It tells Word that the following codes represent a picture of how you want numeric information displayed. The second switch (just before the first semicolon) indicates how you want positive numbers to display. The second (just before the second semicolon) indicates how you want negative numbers to display. The final one (in this case blank, just after the second semicolon) indicates how you want zero values to display. Since this is blank, zero values are displayed as blanks.

You can apply the same logic if you want to display dollar values. Simply change the formatting codes used in the field to match how you want the data displayed:

{ =SUM(ABOVE) \# $#,##0.00;($#,##0.00); }

Here positive numbers are displayed with a dollar sign, commas (if necessary) and two decimal places. Negative values are displayed the same, except there are parentheses around the number. Again, zero values are left blank.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (543) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Displaying Blanks when Summing to Zero.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Jumping to a Specific Page

Want to jump to a particular page in your document? Word makes it easy; just pull up the Go To tab of the Find and Replace ...

Discover More

Changing Elements in Lots of Charts at One Time

Got a bunch of charts that you need to make formatting changes in? You can use a macro (or two) to apply the formatting ...

Discover More

Using Search Text in the Replacement

When you use the Find and Replace tool in Word, you may want to include what you searched for in the replacement text. That's ...

Discover More

The First and Last Word on Word! Bestselling For Dummies author Dan Gookin puts his usual fun and friendly candor back to work to show you how to navigate Word 2013. Spend more time working and less time trying to figure it all out! Check out Word 2013 For Dummies today!

More WordTips (menu)

Entering Calculations in a Form Field

One of the many uses for Word is to create forms that can be easily filled in by other people. This is made possible by the ...

Discover More

Counting Fields in a Document

Need to count the number of times a particular field appears in a document? It's easy to do when you apply the techniques ...

Discover More

Displaying Fields

Fields (sometimes called field codes) allow you to insert dynamic information in your documents. If you want to see the codes ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 8Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is three more than 5?

2016-11-30 12:46:09

David

The currency version does not leave blanks when zero


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.