Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Printing a List of AutoCorrect Entries.

Printing a List of AutoCorrect Entries

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 25, 2014)

The AutoCorrect feature in Word can be very helpful. There may be a time when you want to print a list of AutoCorrect entries, just so you are aware of what they are. There is no intrinsic command in Word to all the AutoCorrect entries like you can print AutoText entries. You can, however, use a macro to print your AutoCorrect entries:

Sub PrintAutoCorrect()
    Dim a As AutoCorrectEntry

    Selection.ParagraphFormat.TabStops.ClearAll
    Selection.ParagraphFormat.TabStops.Add Position:=72, _
      Alignment:=wdAlignTabLeft, Leader:=wdTabLeaderSpaces

    For Each a In Application.AutoCorrect.Entries
        Selection.TypeText a.Name & vbTab & a.Value & " " & vbCr
    Next
End Sub

Before running this macro, make sure that you start with a new document. The macro sets the tab stop in the current paragraph, and then "types" each AutoCorrect entry in the system. When it is through running (it is very fast), you can print the list and then discard the document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (340) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Printing a List of AutoCorrect Entries.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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