Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Creating Multiple Blank Documents in One Step.

Creating Multiple Blank Documents in One Step

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 28, 2012)

1

There are times when Larry absolutely needs to create four or more new blank documents. He wonders if there is a way to create four new blank documents (it would be nice to input how many blank documents needed) at once.

There are a few ways you can approach this problem. If all you want to do is create four new documents, all based on the Normal template, the easiest way is to simply press Ctrl+N four times. (Actually, you can hold down the Ctrl key and press N four times.) The result is four blank documents, ready to be used.

If your documents need to be based on a different template than the Normal template, then it is best to use a macro. The following macro prompts the user for how many documents should be created, and then creates them based on the BusinessReport template.

Sub NewDocuments()
    Dim Answer As Variant
    Dim iNewDocs As Integer
    Dim J As Integer

    Answer = InputBox("How many new documents?")
    iNewDocs = CInt(Answer)
    For J = 1 to iNewDocs
        Documents.Add Template:="BusinessReport", NewTemplate:=False, _
          DocumentType:=wdNewBlankDocument
    Next J
End Sub

The macro could be assigned to a shortcut key or to a button on a toolbar, ready to create your documents. You could also take a slightly different approach with the same code. Create a new document based on the desired template (such as the BusinessReport template), and then add this macro to the template:

Sub AutoOpen()
    Dim Answer As Variant
    Dim iNewDocs As Integer
    Dim J As Integer

    Answer = InputBox("How many more docs?", "Doc Count")
    iNewDocs = CInt(Answer)
    For J = 1 To iNewDocs
        Documents.Add Template:="BusinessReport", NewTemplate:=False, _
          DocumentType:=wdNewBlankDocument
    Next
End Sub

Save the document under a name such as "MultipleDocs.doc." The basis of the macro is the same as the previous one. The difference is the name given to the macro. Since it uses the special AutoOpen name, then whenever the MultipleDocs document is subsequently opened, the macro is automatically run and the user is asked how many additional documents to create.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (11236) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Creating Multiple Blank Documents in One Step.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 7 + 8?

2015-05-19 07:06:46

Bradley Steffens

OMG! Am I the only idiot who did not know about Ctrl+N? I am a professional writer who has been using this piece of a crap with a "ribbon" since it came out, and I have opened every new document by clicking the color ball once, clicking "New" once, and then--worst of all--having to click the idiotic choice between "Blank document" and "Blog post", not just once but twice. I have done this thousands of times--no exaggeration. So, um, thanks hardly does it justice, but thanks!


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