Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Converting Tables to Charts.

Converting Tables to Charts

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 23, 2016)

It is not unusual to present data in both tabular and graphic forms in a report. Word makes it easy to do this. Once you have developed your table, you can convert the information directly into a graph. You do this in the following manner:

  1. Select the table you want converted to a chart.
  2. Choose Object from the Insert menu. Word displays the Object dialog box.
  3. From the list of Object Types, choose Microsoft Graph Chart. (In some versions of Word, the object type may go by a version-specific name, such as Microsoft Graph 2000 Chart.)
  4. Click on OK. Word displays a graphic representation of your tabular data.
  5. Format your graph as desired.
  6. Click anywhere outside of the newly inserted graph to continue working in your document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (7786) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Converting Tables to Charts.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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