Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Creating a Split Page.

Creating a Split Page

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 1, 2014)

6

WordPerfect has a feature that allows you to create a "split page," meaning that you can create different "zones" on a page, and place them side-by-side. This feature was great for creating information that must be laid out side-by-side, such as student material and teacher commentary on that material.

Those coming to Word from a WordPerfect environment may wonder how you can create a split page layout in Word. The best way is through the use of tables in Word. Even for very long documents you can use tables to create side-by-side information. Follow these general steps:

  1. Open a new document and set the paper orientation and margins the way you want.
  2. Insert a three-column, single-row table in your document.
  3. Remove the borders around the table, if desired.
  4. Format the second (center) column to be rather narrow. This column will serve as the margin between the left and right columns.
  5. Adjust the width of the other columns as desired.
  6. Make sure the cells are formatted so that their contents can break across pages.
  7. In the left column, enter your student information; in the right column enter the related teacher commentary.
  8. Whenever you need to "align" or "synchronize" the contents in the columns, start a new row.

Using this technique, you can create documents of virtually any length you desire. The only thing you should be careful of is that you start a new row periodically. Word has been known to go "flaky" when creating tables that have a single row extending for pages and pages.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1604) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Creating a Split Page.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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Comments

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What is three minus 2?

2017-02-13 20:06:56

Rhys

Inserting columns are great for dividing a page downward. But, what if I wanted to divide a page across through the middle?

To clarify, I have a document page on a horizontal setting with two short sections named "Sales," and "Communication". I would like to have Sales on the top, and communication down the bottom

Thanks so much,
Rhys


2016-12-11 14:40:11

Zoya M Sheikh

Its Cool


2016-02-10 12:13:02

Yeboah Samuel

I am very pleased about this site.
i appreciate each and every thing on this.
please i have created two column page layout. i want to number the page by having 1 at left column 2 at right column on one page with two numbers.
eg.

1 2
3 4
please how will i go about it.


2014-07-22 10:03:50

Kathy

Instead of thinking of them as rows, you should think in terms of paragraphs. You can also use the Split Table function in Table Layout.

I have not had a problem with whatever I was putting into a table breaking the way I needed it to.


2014-07-21 12:54:26

Nick

I have been sent a split Document and it is a mess.

I wish to do the exact opposite and reverse split paging.

But How ....... ?


2014-06-24 06:56:17

Ian

"Make sure the cells are formatted so that their contents can break across pages."

How? I dont see anything like this in the options menus for my tables..


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