Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Spell-Checking from the Keyboard.

Spell-Checking from the Keyboard

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 29, 2011)

You may already know that you can right-click on a misspelled word and the resulting Context menu will display suggested corrections for your error. You may not want to use the mouse to activate this feature, however. You might not want to take your hands off the keyboard, which can slow down your editing.

If you are of this ilk, there are two major ways you can display the Context menu for the misspelled word. In both instances, you must make sure the insertion point is somewhere in the misspelled word, then you can do either of the following:

  • If you have one of the 104-key Windows keyboards, press the "right-click key." This is the key next to the right Ctrl key.
  • Press Shift+F10.

Either of these methods results in the Context menu being displayed. You can then use the arrow keys to select a suggested spelling correction. Pressing Enter then makes the correction. If you don't see a suggestion you like, pressing the Esc key dismisses the Context menu.

Another possible solution is to simply place the insertion point someplace before the misspelled word, and then press Alt+F7. This automatically selects the next misspelled word in the document and displays the Context menu with suggested alternatives.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1210) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Spell-Checking from the Keyboard.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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