Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Creating Categories for Your Table of Authorities.

Creating Categories for Your Table of Authorities

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 14, 2013)

If you are developing a long legal document, a table of authorities can be very valuable. Word allows you to divide a table of authorities into categories. For instance, you may want case citations in a different section of the table than statute citations. Word provides seven different categories you can use: cases, statutes, rules, treatises, regulations, constitutional provisions, and other authorities. If you need more than these pre-defined categories, you can create your own categories. Word allows you to define up to 16 different categories, including the seven already defined. You can define your own categories by following these steps:
  1. Press Shift+Alt+I to display the Mark Citation dialog box.
  2. Click on the Categories button. (In some versions of Word it may be called the Category button.) Word displays the Edit Category dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Edit Category dialog box.

  4. In the Category list, select one of the numbers, 8 through 16. (If you select one of the existing seven categories, you will end up replacing it with your new category.)
  5. Edit the text in the Replace With box to reflect how you want the category to appear.
  6. Click on Replace. The edited category name now appears in the Category list.
  7. Click on OK.
You can now use the new category, as desired, to mark and classify citations.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (902) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Creating Categories for Your Table of Authorities.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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