Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Generating a Table of Authorities.

Generating a Table of Authorities

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 20, 2012)

Adding a table of authorities to your document is a two-step process. First you need to mark all the citations within your document, and then you need to actually compile or generate the table. Once you have marked all the citations, you can generate the table of authorities by following these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point where you want the table of authorities inserted.
  2. Choose Reference from the Insert menu, then choose Index and Tables. (In Word 97 or Word 2000, choose Index and Tables directly from the Insert menu.) Word displays the Index and Tables dialog box.
  3. Make sure the Table of Authorities tab is selected. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Table of Authorities tab of the Index and Tables dialog box.

  5. Pick a style in the Formats list. (If you pick the From Template choice, only the table of authorities main head is affected. It relies on the TOA Heading style.)
  6. Click on OK.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (901) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Generating a Table of Authorities.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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