Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Changing Compression Print Resolution.

Changing Compression Print Resolution

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated July 1, 2017)

1

Jon wants to know if he can change the default compression settings in the Format Picture dialog box. When he clicks the Compress button (on the Picture tab of the Format Picture dialog box), the Print resolution setting is 200 dpi. Jon would like to change that to 300 dpi.

There is no way to do this that we've been able to locate. A better solution is to not use Word to do any compression of pictures. Instead, use a dedicated graphics program to modify and edit your graphics just the way you want them, and then add them to your Word document. Why is this better? Because just like you wouldn't use a graphics program to do word processing, it is a good idea to not use your word processor to do graphics. The manipulation and preparation of graphics is specialized enough that you'll get better results if you avoid Word's tools and use those in a specialized program, instead.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (433) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Changing Compression Print Resolution.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is one more than 2?

2018-01-23 21:23:03

John Roberts

Hi Allen,

I would love to "not use Word to do any compression of pictures", however I frequently receive files from my colleagues with the following option set :-

(Word 2016) File > Options > Advanced > Image Size and Quality > Default Resolution > 150 ppi (or lower!)

Then, when I go to insert my lovely 300 ppi image into one of these files, word "helpfully" downscales it to 150 ppi and, to add insult to injury, at the same time Word seems to re-define the image's dimensions, so that when size is re-set to "100%" it is not displayed (or printed) at the same size as the original either. When I manually change this setting (to "High Fidelity"), prior to inserting images, these problems do not occur. As I am presently using a VBA macro to insert the images (updated header logos), is there a vba method to modify this setting? I have looked but am unable to find one. If not, are you able to suggest any helpful alternatives?

Kind regards,

John.


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