Working with Document Panes

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 1, 2013)

Word allows you to divide a document window into two panes that allow you to view two different parts of the same document. To divide a document window into panes, you use the divider bar located in the upper-right corner of the document window. The divider bar is located immediately above the up arrow at the top of the vertical scroll bar at the right side of your document. When you position the mouse pointer over the divider bar, it changes to a different type of pointer. Click on the divider bar and drag it to where you want the document window divided. If you want to divide the document window in half, you can simply double-click on the divider bar.

After dividing a document window into panes, you can adjust the size of the panes at any time. This is done by clicking and dragging the divider bar to the new vertical location where you want the document window divided. When you release the mouse button, the divider bar remains at that point. Each pane is an independent view of your document. This means that you can use different Views in each pane—for instance, Normal view in the top pane and Page Layout in the bottom.

If you want to get rid of the panes, you simply have to double-click on the divider bar. This returns the view in the document window to a single part of the document. When you close a pane, it is the active pane that is removed. Thus, put the insertion point in the pane you want to close before actually closing it.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (376) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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