Easily Inserting a Section Mark

 

When creating legal documents, one of the common symbols you need to use is referred to as a section mark. This looks like a fancy, squiggly S that is used in legal citations. If you need to use this symbol quite a bit, you may already know that you can insert it by holding down the Alt key and pressing 0167 on the numeric keypad. Or, you may have always used the Symbol option from the Insert menu to add the symbol to your documents.

There is an easier way to use the section mark, however, and that is to set up AutoCorrect to insert the symbol for you. Follow these steps:

  1. Choose AutoCorrect (or AutoCorrect Options) from the Tools menu. Word displays the AutoCorrect dialog box.
  2. The AutoCorrect tab should be displayed. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The AutoCorrect tab of the AutoCorrect dialog box.

  4. In the Replace box, enter the characters you want to type to signify a section mark. For instance, on my system I entered (s)—the lowercase letter S surrounded by parentheses.
  5. Position the insertion point in the With box, hold down the Alt key, and press 0167 on the numeric keypad. The section mark should appear in the With box.
  6. Click on Add. Your new AutoCorrect definition is added to those already maintained by Word.
  7. Click on OK.

Now, whenever you want the section mark to appear, all you need to do is type the lowercase letter S surrounded by parentheses and Word will automatically change it to the desired section mark.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (13295) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Do More in Less Time! Are you ready to harness the full power of Word 2013 to create professional documents? In this comprehensive guide you'll learn the skills and techniques for efficiently building the documents you need for your professional and your personal life. Check out Word 2013 In Depth today!

MORE WORDTIPS (MENU)

Replacing All AutoCorrect Entries

Word's AutoCorrect feature can be a great tool to improve your writing. Depending on the type of writing you do, you may need ...

Discover More

Making Sure Word Doesn't Capitalize Anything Automatically

Word, in an effort to be helpful, will often change the capitalization of the words you type. If you tire of Word's ...

Discover More

Spelling Errors Resulting from Erroneous Spaces

Spelling errors can result from improperly ordering letters in a word, or from adding spaces where they shouldn't be. This ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share