Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Endnotes by Chapter.

Endnotes by Chapter

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated April 25, 2020)

David has a book manuscript that consists of twenty chapters. Each chapter is in its own document file, and each chapter has its own endnotes. He would like to create one large, single document file for the manuscript, with the endnotes properly separated by chapter at the end, and renumbered from 1-X in each endnote section, as they are now.

This can be done rather easily, as Word allows you to specify that endnotes should appear at one of two places in a document: either the end of each section or at the end of the document itself. Follow these general steps:

  1. Create a new, blank document.
  2. Define the layout for the new document to match whatever layout you want for your book. (Set margins, orientation, etc.)
  3. Display the Footnote and Endnote dialog box. Do this in Word 97 and Word 2000 by choosing Insert | Footnote. Do this in Word 2002 and Word 2003 by choosing Insert | Reference | Footnote. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Footnote and Endnote dialog box.

  5. Make sure the Endnotes radio button is selected.
  6. If you are using Word 97 or Word 2000, click the Options button. Word displays the Note Options dialog box.
  7. Change the Place At option to End of Section.
  8. Change the Start At value to 1.
  9. Choose the Restart Each Section radio button.
  10. If you are using Word 97 or Word 2000, click OK to close the Note Options dialog box and then click Cancel to close the Footnote and Endnote dialog box.
  11. If you are using Word 2002 or later, click Apply.
  12. Choose Insert | File to insert your first chapter file.
  13. Insert a section break at the end of the chapter file you just inserted.
  14. Insert your next chapter file after the section break.
  15. Repeat steps 12 and 13 for each of your remaining chapter files.

What you end up with is each chapter divided by sections breaks, with the endnotes configured to appear at the end of each section. Numbering of the endnotes will begin at 1 in each section.

The only time this approach will present a problem is if you have section breaks within a chapter. For instance, if you switch from a one-column to a two-column layout within a chapter, then the layout change requires the insertion of a section break. Since endnotes are configured to appear at the end of each section, that means you may have endnotes that appear at the end of your one-column layout and then at the end of the section that marks the end of the chapter. This is probably not what you want.

You can suppress the endnotes for some sections in your document (such as the first part of the chapter, before the layout change), but that presents additional problems with numbering. Since numbering is designed to start at 1 for each section, you may end up with two (or more) endnotes numbered "1" in a single chapter. You can get around this by applying continuous endnote numbering for the entire document, instead of restarting the number in each section.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (3854) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Endnotes by Chapter.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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