Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Saving Changes when Closing.

Saving Changes when Closing

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 11, 2014)

If you modify a Word document and then close the document, you are asked if you want to save your changes. This is a good feature that helps ensure you don't mistakenly throw away some of your work.

When running a macro, however, you may not want to be bothered with a dialog box asking if you want to save your changes. If the macro modifies a document in some way, and you use the Close method, you are asked if you want to save your changes, just as you are if you manually close a document without saving.

The way to get around this is to use some of the parameters available with the close method. Consider the following:

ActiveDocument.Close SaveChanges:=wdDoNotSaveChanges
ActiveDocument.Close SaveChanges:=wdSaveChanges

Both lines of code close the active document. The difference between the lines is in the setting of the SaveChanges parameter. In the case of the first line, any changes will be discarded, while the second line results in the document being saved when it is closed. If you prefer to be asked every time, just use either of the following lines:

ActiveDocument.Close
ActiveDocument.Close SaveChanges:=wdPromptToSaveChanges

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1301) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Saving Changes when Closing.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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