Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Creating One-time Labels.

Creating One-time Labels

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 28, 2013)

1

Word is a versatile program that allows you to create all sorts of documents. One potential use of Word is to create mailing labels. Many people create mailing labels using the Mail Merge feature of Word, which pulls names and addresses from a data source and formats them for printing on labels.

But what if you need to create labels that aren't originating from a data source? What if you need only a few labels to go on a small mailing, and you never need the labels again? There is a quick way to handle this situation in Word, as well. Simply follow these steps:

  1. Display the Envelopes and Labels dialog box. (In Word 2003 select Tools | Letters and Mailings | Envelopes and Labels. In older versions of Word choose Tools | Envelopes and Labels.)
  2. Make sure the Labels tab is selected, if it is not selected already. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Labels tab of the Envelopes and Labels dialog box.

  4. If you need to change the type of labels on which you are printing, click on the Options button and use the Labels Options dialog box to select the proper label stock.
  5. Make sure the Use Return Address check box is cleared.
  6. If there is anything in the Address box, delete it.
  7. Make sure the Full Page of the Same Label radio button is selected.
  8. Click on New Document. The dialog box closes and Word creates a new document consisting of blank labels.

Word creates a new document that shows your labels. Word formats labels using tables. Each cell of the table corresponds to a single label. To enter your label information, just position the insertion point in the desired cell (label) and start typing.

If you are printing labels on a printer that handles sheets of paper (laser or inkjet, for instance), Word formats a table that represents an entire sheet of labels. Some types of labels are continuous in nature, such as those for the old dot-matrix printers. If that is the type of label stock you are using, Word formats a single-cell table that represents a single label. In this case you will need to add additional cells to represent each additional label you need to print. One way you can add the cells/labels is to position the insertion point in the existing cell/label and press the Tab key. Word adds a new cell/label below the old one.

Once you are done entering and formatting your label information, you can print your document on your label stock. Save the labels, if desired, or simply discard the document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (897) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Creating One-time Labels.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is three more than 8?

2013-09-29 04:28:06

Steve Wells

Avery provides (for free) some nice Word templates for many of their specific label types. With just a bit of tweaking to get the spacing to work for my printer, they make it simple to print a bunch or a few labels as needed. I use the Mini-sheets (2080 - color coded and 2181 - all white) a lot for labeling just a few file folders at a time, whenever I need them.


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