Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Jumping to the Top of a Page.

Jumping to the Top of a Page

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 14, 2016)

Word doesn't have a built-in command to jump to the top of the current (or next) page. Instead, Word expects you to use the Go To command to make those sort of jumps. (Just press F5, select Page, then click on Next or Previous.) If you need to jump to the top of the current page quite often, this approach can quickly become tedious. Sounds like a perfect opportunity to use a macro!

The following macro jumps to the top of the current page:

Sub TopOfThisPage()
    Selection.GoTo What:=wdGoToBookmark, Name:="\Page"
    Selection.MoveLeft Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1
End Sub

If you want to go to the top of the next page, simply change the MoveLeft method to the MoveRight method. The macro relies on the use of the \Page bookmark, which is built-in to Word.

Once the macro is created, you can assign it to a keyboard shortcut or design a toolbar button to utilize it.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (742) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Jumping to the Top of a Page.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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