Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Repeating Rows for a Table Footer.

Repeating Rows for a Table Footer

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 2, 2017)

1

Nancy asked if there were a way in Word to repeat rows at the bottom of a table that spans multiple pages, the same way you can repeat rows at the top of a multi-page table. The short answer is that Word doesn't provide such a capability. If you are willing to experiment a bit, you can try to come up with a workaround that may do the trick for you.

What you want to do is create a document section that contains just your table, and then use the page footers to contain the rows you want repeated from the table. Follow these general steps:

  1. Just before the start of your table, insert a continuous section break.
  2. Do the same thing just after the end of your table.
  3. Select the rows you want repeated at the bottom of the table and copy them to the Clipboard.
  4. Choose View | Header and Footer to display the headers and footers of the document.
  5. Switch to the footer.
  6. Make sure that the Link to Previous option is turned off for the footer.
  7. Select anything that already exists in the footer.
  8. Press Ctrl+V to paste the copied rows into the footer.
  9. Use the controls on the Header and Footer toolbar to advance to the next section. (You should be looking at the footer for the section following the section in which the table resides.)
  10. Turn off the Link to Previous option for this footer.
  11. Delete the table row from this section's footer.
  12. Close the Header and Footer toolbar (click Close).

You are now ready to place the final touches on your workaround. Position the insertion point somewhere in your table, then use the various tabs in the Page Setup dialog box to adjust the relationship between your table and the footer. You'll need to play with the settings on both the Margins and Layout tabs to position the rows in the page footer, and you'll want to make sure that the Apply To drop-down list applies the changes to only the current section (the one with the table in it).

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (415) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Repeating Rows for a Table Footer.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 7 + 5?

2019-12-17 18:53:21

Kim

I am struggling with an .rtf template that translates into a 2-part check when run through Oracle.

The check's MICR line must be lower on the page than Word seems to want to allow me to print.

The template goes across two pages but prints out a single page check. Everything else is working perfectly and is located where it should be with the exception that the MICR line is about 1/4" too high. I have tried space before and space after but if I can get the top of the row to be where I need it, the bottom gets cut off even though there is plenty of room left on the page to print the line.

I appreciate your assistance on this task.


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