Loading
Word.Tips.Net WordTips (Menu Interface)

Extracting Pictures from a Document

Richard requested information on how to extract pictures from a Word document in their original format. His observation was that if you simply selected the graphic (in Word) and then copied the graphic to the Clipboard, when you pasted the graphic into your favorite graphics program, it was in a bit-mapped form. Richard was looking for a way to copy the underlying format of the graphic (the format the graphic had when it was placed into Word) in order to maintain the highest image quality possible.

The good news, Richard, is that you are very observant—when you copy a graphic from Word, it indeed is done as a bit-mapped image. This is because of the way in which Word handles graphics. When you paste a graphic into a Word 97 document it is automatically converted into a bit-mapped (BMP) format, regardless of the format in which the graphic originally existed. For instance, if your original graphic is in TIF format, then pasting it into Word runs the graphic through Word's graphic filter, and it is converted to BMP format for inclusion in the document. Thus, once the graphic is pasted into a document, there is no way to recover the original TIF format—it doesn't exist, as far as Word 97 is concerned.

Things changed beginning with Word 2000, however. Besides working with BMP graphics, later versions of Word also natively understand GIF and JPG graphic formats. The reason for this is that those two formats are the predominant graphic formats on the Web, and Word wants to be a Web-enabled product. However, if you place a graphic in a Word document as a JPG, and then later copy it, the copy is still copied as a BMP format.

In order to get to the underlying GIF or JPG format, you can simply save the document in HTML format. This format requires that the graphics be in separate files, since they cannot be embedded within an HTML document. Once you save the document in this format, take a look at the files produced by Word—the individual graphics files should be there somewhere.

If you want to avoid the graphic conversion issue entirely, then you either need to keep original copies of your graphics images, or you should link images into your document rather than pasting them. Procedures on how to do this have been covered in other issues of WordTips.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1489) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Related Tips:

Learning Made Easy! Quickly teach yourself how to format, publish, and share your content using Word 2013. With Step by Step, you set the pace, building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Check out Microsoft Word 2013 Step by Step today!

 

Leave your own comment:

*Name:
Email:
  Notify me about new comments ONLY FOR THIS TIP
Notify me about new comments ANYWHERE ON THIS SITE
Hide my email address
*Text:
*What is 5+3 (To prevent automated submissions and spam.)
 
 
           Commenting Terms

Comments for this tip:

Fred Burg    18 Apr 2015, 09:08
If saving the Word document in HTML format preserves the pictures as its own file, what happens in between the time when you pasted the picture and when you saved the file? If Word writes the picture as its own GIF or JPG upon saving, it would seem there should be a way of recovering the GIF or JPG before the save.
 
 

Our Company

Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.

About Tips.Net

Contact Us

 

Advertise with Us

Our Privacy Policy

Our Sites

Tips.Net

Beauty and Style

Cars

Cleaning

Cooking

DriveTips (Google Drive)

ExcelTips (Excel 97–2003)

ExcelTips (Excel 2007–2016)

Gardening

Health

Home Improvement

Money and Finances

Organizing

Pests and Bugs

Pets and Animals

WindowsTips (Microsoft Windows)

WordTips (Word 97–2003)

WordTips (Word 2007–2016)

Our Products

Helpful E-books

Newsletter Archives

 

Excel Products

Word Products

Our Authors

Author Index

Write for Tips.Net

Copyright © 2016 Sharon Parq Associates, Inc.