Keeping Fields and Text Together

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 23, 2016)

Fields are a great boon for developing interactive documents. One common use of fields is to create cross-references to other parts of a document. When inserting a cross-reference field, you may have some type of special identifying text that you need to always follow the field. To keep the field and the identifying text together, you separate the two by a non-breaking space.

Non-breaking spaces are used to control how Word automatically wraps text at the end of a line. The non-breaking space ensures that the text before the space and the text after the space are always on the same line. In the case of fields, however, this doesn't seem to work. Instead, Word blithely wraps text right at the non-breaking space.

This is frustrating, but it appears to be the way that older versions of Word are designed. For some reason, the field before the non-breaking space is not viewed as "text," so Word ignores the non-breaking space. The only way around this is to create your document as you normally would (with the cross-references), and then look through the document to find any instances where the cross-reference is on one line and the identifying text on the next. You can then insert a line break character just before the field so that it is forced to the next line.

The drawback to this, obviously, is that if you edit your document or if the cross-references change, you'll need to go through and remove the line breaks to make sure that the text wrapping still makes sense.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (7656) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Changing AutoComplete Words

AutoComplete allows you to easily complete words you are typing in your document. If AutoComplete is presenting you with the ...

Discover More

Locking Worksheet Names

Want to stop other people from changing the names of your worksheets? You can provide the desired safeguard by using the ...

Discover More

Adjusting Cell Margins for More White Space

Is the information in your cells too jammed up? Here are some ways you can add some white space around that information so it ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

MORE WORDTIPS (MENU)

Selecting a Field

Do you need to select a field? It is as simple as selecting a single character, as this tip explains.

Discover More

Removing Specific Fields

Word allows you to place all sorts of fields in your documents. If you want to search for only specific types of fields, then ...

Discover More

Inserting the Template Name in Your Document

Templates are a powerful part of the Word experience, as they allow you to create and format documents based on patterns. ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share