Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Underlining Quoted Text.

Underlining Quoted Text

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 25, 2018)

For some documents, you may have the need to underline information within quotes. For instance, for some legal documents you may need to find all material surrounded by quotes, and then make the information between the quotes underlined. This is different from regular prose writing, where you would use either underlines or quotes, but not both.

If you have a need to search for all quoted text and make it underlined, you can use the following macro. It searches for quote marks and when it finds one, it underlines everything up to the next quote mark. Note that it will not actually underline the quote marks themselves.

Sub UnderlineQuoted()
    Dim bDelQuotes As Boolean
    Dim bMvRt As Boolean
    Selection.HomeKey Unit:=wdStory

    ' controls deletion of quote marks
    bDelQuotes = False
    
    With Selection.Find
        .ClearFormatting
        .Text = Chr(34)
        .Replacement.Text = ""
        .Forward = True
        .Wrap = wdFindStop
        .Execute
    End With

    While Selection.Find.Found
        Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1
        ' switch on selection extend mode
        Selection.ExtendMode = True
        bMvRt = True
        ' find second quote of this pair
        Selection.Find.Execute
        If Selection.Find.Found Then
            Selection.MoveLeft Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1
            If Len(Selection.Range.Text) > 0 Then
                ' make it underlined
                Selection.Font.Underline = True
                ' delete quote marks, if appropriate
                If bDelQuotes Then
                    Selection.Cut
                    Selection.TypeBackspace
                    Selection.Delete Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1
                    Selection.Paste
                    bMvRt = False
                End If
            End If
        End If
        Selection.ExtendMode = False
        If bMvRt Then
            Selection.Collapse Direction:=wdCollapseEnd
            Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1
        End If
        Selection.Find.Execute
    Wend
End Sub

Pay attention to the setting of the bDelQuotes variable. If set to False (as it is here), then the quote marks themselves are not deleted by the macro. If you change the value of the variable to True, then the macro gets rid of the quote marks in the document. Note that it only gets rid of the quote marks if it actually underlines text between those quote marks.

Note:

If you would like to know how to use the macros described on this page (or on any other page on the WordTips sites), I've prepared a special page that includes helpful information. Click here to open that special page in a new browser tab.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1589) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Underlining Quoted Text.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Header and Footer Data Codes

When creating headers and footers in an Excel worksheet, you can use special codes to add or format information. This tip ...

Discover More

Turning Off Worksheet Tabs

Look at the bottom of a worksheet and chances are you will see tabs for all the worksheets in the current workbook. Want ...

Discover More

Excluding Some Data from a Chart

Excel is a whiz at creating charts from your worksheet data. When the program tries to determine what should be included ...

Discover More

Do More in Less Time! Are you ready to harness the full power of Word 2013 to create professional documents? In this comprehensive guide you'll learn the skills and techniques for efficiently building the documents you need for your professional and your personal life. Check out Word 2013 In Depth today!

More WordTips (menu)

Missing Fonts in a Letterhead

When you create a document (such as a letterhead) that you want multiple people to use, you need to be concerned with ...

Discover More

Applying the All Caps Format

Want your text to always appear in upper-case, regardless of how you type it? Word allows you to add formatting to your ...

Discover More

Underlining Tabs In Numbered Lists

When Word creates an automatically numbered list, it removes some of your formatting flexibility. One thing you can't ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is nine more than 5?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.