Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Putting Character Codes to Work.

Putting Character Codes to Work

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated March 3, 2017)

4

If you know the ASCII or ANSI codes for a particular character, and you want to enter it into your document, you can do so by holding down the Alt key and using the numeric keypad. If you enter a three-digit code, then Windows assumes you want the ASCII character associated with that code. If you enter a four-digit code, then Windows assumes you want the ANSI character associated with that code.

For instance, the ASCII code for an uppercase A is 65. You could enter this character by holding down the Alt key and pressing 065 (a three-digit code) on the numeric keypad. It just so happens that this is the same as the ANSI code for an uppercase A, as well. Thus, you could hold down the Alt key and press 0065 (a four-digit code) for the same result. This works because the ASCII and ANSI codes are the same for all values between 0 and 127. When you work with values between 128 and 255, they are different.

You can see this difference by holding down the Alt key and pressing 163 (a three-digit code) on the numeric keypad. This inserts a foreign language character in your document. If you instead use a four-digit code for the same number (hold down the Alt key and press 0163), Word inserts the symbol for the British pound.

You should also know that you can use the Alt key with a regular value. For instance, you can type Alt and then the number 3 on the keypad. This inserts a character for a heart. The values between 0 and 31 do not represent printable characters in either ASCII or ANSI codes. If you hold down the Alt key and enter a number between 1 and 31 on the numeric keypad, Word inserts various miscellaneous dingbat characters in your document. The best way to see how this works is to simply try it in a document of your choosing.

To insert the full range of Unicode characters into your document, you cannot use the simple approach of holding down the Alt key and using the numeric keypad. Instead, you must choose Symbol from the Insert menu to display the Symbol dialog box. You can then choose a font and a Unicode subset. Word then displays the available characters in the dialog box, and you can select the character you want to insert.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1789) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Putting Character Codes to Work.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Preventing Printing

When dealing with determined users, it is virtually impossible to prevent information in your document from being ...

Discover More

Taking Pictures

Have you ever wanted to take a "picture" of a part of a worksheet and put it in another section? This tip explains how to ...

Discover More

What Changes Did I Make In that Template?

When you make changes that affect a template, Word usually asks you if you want to save those changes when you exit the ...

Discover More

Create Custom Apps with VBA! Discover how to extend the capabilities of Office 2013 (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access) with VBA programming, using it for writing macros, automating Office applications, and creating custom applications. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2013 today!

More WordTips (menu)

Using Overtype Mode

When you type information into a document, what you type normally is inserted just the left of the insertion point. Word ...

Discover More

Turning Off Paste Options

Paste information into a document and you'll immediately see a small icon next to the pasted information. This icon ...

Discover More

Extra Space after Quotation Mark when Pasting

Have you ever noticed how Word can decide to add extra spaces when you paste information into your document? This is part ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is six more than 8?

2018-10-22 10:40:04

Vinay Jha

Type the unicode hex value of any character and then press Alt+x, the character will drop on any document of MsWord, Wordpad, Outlook, or any program using rich text box. Charmap is only for BMP (also called SMP-0) plane of unicode which includes all major scripts of the world but excludes most of the minor scripts and all ancient scripts. But Alt+x works for all 17 planes of Unicode Full range, upto the last codepoint hex "10FFFF", provided the font is installed in your machine. Only non-unicode characters in a font cannot be used by this or by any method because they do not have any unicode number by which a character can be called, and such non-unicode characters are called internally by the LOOKUP feature built inside a font. Most of the modern scripts are in Arial Unicode font, and many major ancient scripts are in Segoe Historic font, both these fonts are freely shipped and installed by Windows. In MsWord, there is no need to select a font for calling its characters through Alt+x method if the font is inside BMP range, but if the font is not part of Windows fonts installed automatically, then you must select the font in MsWord before using Alt+x.


2015-08-17 01:41:25

Steve Wells

Glad to help, even 3½ years later. I will stress again that the Alt+X tip works fine, and because it toggles between the symbol and the hexadecimal code, you can toggle a symbol you come across back to discover its hex value.
However, the Alt+[Decimal code] is easiest for general symbol access. I created my cheat sheet in Excel and placed a printed copy near my work desk. Some columns have the symbols, and adjacent columns show decimal codes, which I didn’t even need to calculate. In some columns off to the side (outside the range that I print), I copied the hexadecimal codes from Character Map. Instead of calculating the decimal values, I let Excel do it for me. For example, in cell J7 is a dark triangle that points to the right. Several columns over in M7 is 25BA, the hex code. Next to the triangle, in cell K is =HEX2DEC(M7), which does the hex to decimal conversion for me. I just copy the function in column K to the rest of the column for the other symbols and hex codes, and the conversions are automatic.
It’s a lot simpler to show than to describe in text. Email me if you’d like a copy of my sheet, and you could adapt it easily for the symbols that you use frequently.


2015-08-14 12:55:56

Linda

Steve:
I thought I was pretty good with Word but I never knew about alt+x. Very helpful - thanks.


2012-01-21 03:06:55

Steve Wells

The tip is not quite correct. You CAN insert Unicode characters by holding down ALT and typing four digits on the key pad, but they must be decimal values, not the hexadecimal values. I will also provide some other useful ways to enter Unicode characters.

Let's look at an example. Open the Windows applet Character Map, on the Start menu typically under Programs (or All Programs)>Accessories>System Tools. Or find charmap.exe usually in the WindowsSystem32 folder.

The applet shows the Unicode value for any selected character. In major fonts such as Arial and Times New Roman, you can find some useful fraction characters. Suppose you need three-eighths as a single character. You could select and copy it within the applet, or you could enter it directly into a Word document in either of two ways.

1. The fraction has a Unicode hexadecimal value of 215C. Type 215C into your document (with any keys, and you can use either upper or lower case for the letter C), select the four characters that you just typed, and press ALT+X, which toggles between the code and the actual fraction character. Similarly, to create an infinity sign, type its hexadecimal value 221E, select the 221E, and press ALT+X to get the infinity character.

2. Suppose you intend to make a little "cheat sheet" of some codes that you'll use often. You should find a calculator that converts hex to decimal and write down the decimal equivalents of the hexadecimal codes. This is worth doing, because you only have to find the conversions once for each character you intend to use. For example, the value of 215C (hex) is 8540 (decimal). So just hold down ALT, type 8540 on the numeric keypad, and release the ALT key. The three-eighths character appears. You'll have to look up some code (hex or decimal) anyway, so you might as well use the one that you can simply type with ALT. Again, to get the infinity character, hold down ALT, type its decimal (not hex) value of 8734 on the keypad, and release ALT. That's easier than any other way.


This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.