Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Inserting the Name of the Last Person to Save the Document.

Inserting the Name of the Last Person to Save the Document

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 15, 2016)

When Word saves the properties related to your document, one of the items it tracks is who the last person to save the document was. This is particularly pertinent if you are working on Word documents in a networked environment where multiple people may be working on the same document. When a document is first saved, this name is set to the same as the Word user name.

Word allows you to insert the name of the person who last saved the document directly in your document, and to have it updated automatically whenever the name changes. This is done by following these steps:

  1. Position the insertion point where you want the name inserted.
  2. Choose Field from the Insert menu. Word displays the Field dialog box.
  3. In the Categories list choose Document Information. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Field dialog box.

  5. Select LastSavedBy from the Field Names list.
  6. Click on OK.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1042) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Inserting the Name of the Last Person to Save the Document.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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