Previewing Your Web Page

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated October 13, 2016)

Word allows you to create Web pages based on the contents of the document. In Word 2000, Word 2002, and Word 2003 Microsoft added the capability of seeing what your Web page will look like to a browser. You can get an idea of how things will look by choosing the Web Page Preview option from the File menu. This is similar in purpose to the Print Preview option—it allows you to see what your document looks like before actually committing it to a final form. The major difference is that Word loads your Web browser software and then displays your document using that program. In other words, the previewing does not take place within Word, but in your Web browser.

You should view the Web Page Preview command as a development tool only, and not as the final judge of how well things look. Once you save your Web page in an HTML format, then you should still load it using a Web browser (outside of Word) to make sure it looks as you expect it to. Better yet, you may want to load the page with two or three different browsers to ensure everything looks fine in each of them.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (833) applies to Microsoft Word 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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