Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: One Change Affects Everything.

One Change Affects Everything

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 10, 2016)

4

Perhaps you've had this happen to you: You are typing along, and you decide you need to make a formatting change in your document. In this particular case, you want to format a particular paragraph as bold face. You select the paragraph, click on the Bold tool on the toolbar, and all the paragraphs in your document change to bold—not just the one you selected.

Or, you decide you want to add a bullet to the start of one paragraph. You select the paragraph, click the Bullets tool, and bullets appear in front of all the paragraphs in the document—not just the one you selected. What is going on, and how can this be corrected?

When this type of change occurs, you can press Ctrl+Z right away (the Undo shortcut) and Word reverses its action. Continually pressing Ctrl+Z is a pain, however. It is much better to understand the cause of the problem, then you can make the changes you need.

Formatting in Word is based on styles. Even if you don't know what styles are or have made a conscious decision to never use styles, they are still there, working in the background. Every paragraph in your document is based on an underlying style that defines how that paragraph appears on the page. With this tidbit firmly understood, the next time you get a "global change" when you only wanted to affect a single paragraph, follow these three steps to greater enlightenment:

  1. Press Ctrl+Z to undo the global change.
  2. With the insertion point still in the paragraph you formatted (or the paragraph completely selected), choose Style from the Format menu if you are using Word 97 or Word 2000. Word displays the Style dialog box, with the appropriate style of your paragraph already selected. If you are using Word 2002 or Word 2003, choose Styles and Formatting from the Format menu to display the Styles and Formatting task pane. Hover the mouse pointer over the selected style and click on the down-arrow at its right side.
  3. Click on Modify. Word displays the Modify Style dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Modify Style dialog box.

Take a good look at the dialog box. At the bottom is a check box labeled Automatically Update. If this check box is selected, it means that whenever you make changes to the paragraph, in your document, those changes are automatically made to the style that is assigned to the paragraph. Once the change is made, then every other paragraph in your document that is formatted using the same style is automatically changed.

If you are a person that ignores styles completely, or who thinks you don't need to worry about them, this is where you can get into trouble. In most cases, Word uses the Normal style as the default style for paragraphs in a document. If the Normal style has the Automatically Update check box selected, it is guaranteed that you will experience the problems described at the beginning of this tip.

To solve this problem, follow these steps:

  1. Display the Modify Style dialog box, as described in the previous three steps.
  2. Make sure the Automatically Update check box is cleared.
  3. Make sure the Add to Template check box is selected.
  4. Click on OK to close the Modify Style dialog box.
  5. Click on Close in the Style dialog box in Word 97 and Word 2000, or close the Styles and Formatting task pane in Word 2002 and Word 2003.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (569) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: One Change Affects Everything.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 4 + 3?

2017-10-31 16:53:56

siobhan

Thank you so much, this was driving me nuts!! Thanks!!!


2017-10-10 04:33:35

ALmir

danke, vielmals


2017-09-30 16:37:02

Jessica

Thank you! This problem was so annoying


2017-01-12 16:38:38

Dan

This has been driving me nuts for months, thank you so much for this simple fix!!!!


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