Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Creating Point Pages.

Creating Point Pages

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 22, 2014)

Larry works for a government contractor that produces very large documents—commonly hundreds or even thousands of pages. When they issue updates to the documents, it is done using "point pages." This means that if the update adds some pages between pages 42 and 43 of the existing document, then those pages are numbered as 42.1 and 42.2. Larry was wondering if there was a way in Word to create point pages and have the page numbering done correctly.

The only way to do this is to, within the document, insert a new section that will contain the point pages. The new section should be formatted so that it doesn't use the same header or footer (wherever you have the page numbers) as the previous section. In addition, the section following the point pages (the original document) will need to have its header or footer formatted to match the original formatting so that it doesn't continue the header or footer in the point pages.

In the new section—the one for the point pages—you can set up the header or footer to reflect the new numbering you want. For instance, you could define a footer that contained "Page 42." and follow this text with a page number. Start the page numbering for the section at 1, and you will end up with 42.1, 42.2, 42.3, etc. for all the pages in the new section.

In the section that follows the point pages, you'll need to configure the page numbers so that they start with whatever number they should begin with, such as page 43. This allows the page numbering to proceed as it should, until the next point pages section is reached.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (218) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Creating Point Pages.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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