Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Writing a Macro from Scratch.

Writing a Macro from Scratch

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 8, 2012)

Many of the tips used in WordTips rely upon macros in order to run. Some readers may not know how to enter a macro from scratch in Word. There are actually two ways you can create macros. First you can record a macro, which is appropriate when you want to record a series of steps you perform quite often. The second method of creating a macro, writing one from scratch, is much more powerful.

To create a macro from scratch, follow these steps:

  1. Choose the Macro option from the Tools menu, then choose Macros from the resulting submenu. Word displays the Macros dialog box. (You can also display the Macros dialog box by simply pressing Alt+F8.)
  2. In the Macros In box (at the bottom of the dialog box), select where you want your new macro stored. Select Normal.dot (Global Template) if you want your macro available in all documents; select a different template if you want the macro available only with the current document template. You can even assign a macro to a specific document.
  3. In the Macro Name box, type a descriptive name you want assigned to the macro you are writing. Optionally, you can enter information in the Description box.
  4. Click on Create. The VBA Editor is started and you can write your macro.
  5. When you are through, close the macro window by selecting the Close and Return to Microsoft Word option from the File menu, or press Alt+Q.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (109) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Writing a Macro from Scratch.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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