Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Document Shows as 'In Use' by Another User.

Document Shows as 'In Use' by Another User

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 7, 2012)

What would you do if you started a new session with Word, and then went to open a document, only to see a message stating that the document you want to open is "locked for editing by another user?" Word gives you the option to open a read-only version of the document, but you want to edit the real document. What do you do?

To understand what happened, it is helpful to understand a little of how Word (all current versions except Word 97) opens documents. When you open a document, Word creates what is known as an owner file for the document. This file is created in the same folder as the document you are opening. Its name consists of a tilde (~) followed by a dollar sign ($) and then the rest of the file name of the document you are opening. For instance, if you try to open a document named BigBudget.doc, then Word creates an owner file with the name ~$gBudget.doc.

The owner file is a way for Word to realize who has the document open at the current time. It is a temporary file (it is deleted when you close the document) that holds the login name of the person that opened the document.

This is where the confusion comes in. If you see the error message described at the beginning of this tip, it means that one of three conditions exists:

  • Word was shut down improperly and the owner file could not be deleted. For instance, the power to your machine was interrupted for some reason.
  • The document is accessible on a network and a different user has the document open.
  • A second instance of Word is running, and the document is open in that copy of Word.

If you are sure that there is no other user accessing the file, and you don't have it open in another copy of Word, then you can follow these steps so you can open the file normally:

  1. Get out of Word and restart your system. (This flushes out any errant processes that may be "stuck" in memory.)
  2. Using Windows Explorer, display the folder that contains the document you tried to open.
  3. If you see an owner file in the folder (named according to the format previously described), delete it.
  4. You should now be able to start Word and successfully open the document.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1660) applies to Microsoft Word 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Document Shows as 'In Use' by Another User.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Merging Graphics from Access

An Access database can store all types of data, including graphic images. Merging most data from Access into Word is ...

Discover More

Creating Scenarios

Excel allows you to create different scenarios for the data in your worksheet. These can be saved and managed using the ...

Discover More

Preventing a Frame when Converting a Table to Text

Tables, in Word, can either be inline with the rest of your text or the text can wrap around the table. If you have wrapping ...

Discover More

Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

MORE WORDTIPS (MENU)

Marking Multiple Documents

After using Word for a while, it is easy to accumulate quite a few documents. At some point you may want to make a change to ...

Discover More

Creating Two Versions of the Same Document

You may often need to create two versions of the same document, one with everything and the other with a subset of what is ...

Discover More

Displaying Path Names in the Menu Bar

Want the full path name for a document visible on the screen? Easily add it to a menu bar.

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

This Site

Got a version of Word that uses the menu interface (Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, or Word 2003)? This site is for you! If you use a later version of Word, visit our WordTips site focusing on the ribbon interface.

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WordTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share