Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Determining How Many Windows are Open.

Determining How Many Windows are Open

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated September 18, 2017)

3

It is sometimes helpful for your macro to know how many document windows are open at any given time. For instance, you might want your macro to only run if there is a single window open, or you might even require there to be two windows open. Either way, you need to check how many there are.

You determine the number of open windows by using the Count property of the Windows object. This is done using the following syntax:

X = Windows.Count

After executing the line, X is equal to the number of open windows.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (735) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Determining How Many Windows are Open.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is five more than 7?

2012-11-24 23:53:22

awyatt

This is a statement used in writing macros.

-Allen


2012-11-24 21:33:57

J

I agree with Don. What do you do with the "X = window count"?


2012-11-24 19:49:12

Don

Sorry but I don't understand this. What do you do with the "X = window count"?
Or where do you find it?


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