Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Printing and Exiting Word in a Macro.

Printing and Exiting Word in a Macro

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 19, 2017)

Robert needs a macro that will load a document, print it out, and then exit Word. He's figured out how to load the document and start to print it, but when he tells the macro to exit Word, he sees a message saying that if he quits, any printing will be deleted.

This message is displayed because the default method for printing in Word is to print in the background, which means that the command to shut down Word is executed while the printing is still going on in the background. The solution is to make sure that background printing is turned off in the print command:

ActiveDocument.PrintOut Background:=False

Since printing will be done in the "foreground," the next macro command will not be executed until the printout is complete. In this way, the printing is very much like printing from within Windows itself: right-click a document and choose Print from the Context menu, and Word is loaded, the document printed, and Word then shuts down.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (450) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Printing and Exiting Word in a Macro.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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