Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Changing Tabs Using the Ruler.

Changing Tabs Using the Ruler

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated November 21, 2015)

Once tabs are set, they appear on the ruler, right under the measurement markings. You can quickly adjust tab stops by using your mouse to drag the markings to a new location on the ruler. Simply point to a tab stop marking with the mouse, click on the left mouse button, and drag the tab stop to a different location. Release the mouse button when you are satisfied with the new tab location. If you want to delete a tab, don't drag it to a new location—drag it entirely off the ruler instead.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (245) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Changing Tabs Using the Ruler.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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