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Converting Paragraphs to Comments

Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Converting Paragraphs to Comments.

When developing a document, it is not unusual to use a particular paragraph style for editorial notes. For instance, the notes may be stored in paragraphs using the Notes style. At some point, you may want to take all the paragraphs that use the Notes style and convert them to actual comments in the document. You can go through the document and make the conversion manually, but this can quickly get tedious. Instead, use a macro that does the conversion for you:

Sub ConvertNotesToComments()
    Dim CommentText As String
    Dim MyRange As Range
    Dim iPCount As Integer
    Dim J As Integer

    Application.ScreenUpdating = False
    iPCount = ActiveDocument.Paragraphs.Count

    For J = iPCount To 1 Step -1
        If ActiveDocument.Paragraphs(J).Style = _
          ActiveDocument.Styles("Notes") Then
            Set MyRange = ActiveDocument.Paragraphs(J).Range
            CommentText = MyRange.Text

            'Get rid of trailing end-of-paragraph mark
            CommentText = Left(CommentText, Len(CommentText) - 1)

            'Move selection to end of previous paragraph
            MyRange.Collapse (wdCollapseStart)
            MyRange.Move Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=-1

            'The original paragraph is no longer necessary
            ActiveDocument.Paragraphs(J).Range.Delete

            'Create the comment at the range location
            ActiveDocument.Comments.Add Range:=MyRange, _
              Text:=CommentText
        End If
    Next J
    Application.ScreenUpdating = True
End Sub

The macro steps backwards through the document, looking at the style of each paragraph. If it finds one that uses the Notes style, then it moves the text of the paragraph into the CommentText variable, and then gets rid of the paragraph. The comment is then added to the end of the paragraph prior to where the deletion was made.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (5404) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Converting Paragraphs to Comments.

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Comprehensive VBA Guide Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the language used for writing macros in all Office programs. This complete guide shows both professionals and novices how to master VBA in order to customize the entire Office suite for their needs. Check out Mastering VBA for Office 2010 today!

 

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Comments for this tip:

Victor M    27 Apr 2015, 22:10
On April 30, 1789, George Washington took the oath of office as the first president of the United States. After his inauguration, Washington addressed both houses of Congress. He asked Congress to work with him to put into place “the wise measures on which the success of this government must depend.” At times, his hands shook so much that he had trouble reading his speech.
The Debate over Washington’s Title Washington had reason to be nervous. The first Congress was deeply divided. Some members were eager to build a strong national government. Others were just as eager to limit the power of the new government. These differences showed up immediately in a debate over what title to use when addressing the president.
Vice President John Adams pointed out that European heads of government had titles like “Your Excellency” that showed respect for their office. The president, he argued, should have a similar title. Supporters of a strong national government agreed.
Others argued that such titles smelled of royalty and had no place in a democracy. A few members of Congress joked that the rather plump Adams should be given the title “His Rotundity” (His Roundness). The debate finally ended when Washington let it be known that he preferred the simple title “Mr. President.”
Setting Up the Executive Branch Next, Congress turned to the task of creating executive departments. As Washington had feared, arguments broke out at once over what those departments should be and what powers they should have.
Congress eventually approved three departments. The Department of State was set up to handle relations with other countries. The Department of War was established to defend the nation. The Treasury Department was set up to oversee the nation’s finances. Congress also created an attorney general to serve as the president’s legal adviser and a postmaster general to head the postal system.
Washington chose men he trusted —such as Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and Henry Knox—to fill these positions. He often met with them to ask for their ideas and advice. The heads of the executive departments came to be known as the president’s cabinet.
 
 

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