Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Printing a Full Style Sheet.

Printing a Full Style Sheet

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 25, 2014)

Dave would love a way to print a full-featured style sheet for his documents. He knows that he can choose to print "Styles" in the Print dialog box, but he would rather have a style sheet that shows the actual styles, such as color, size, font, etc.

Unfortunately there is no such capability in Word. You can, however, create a style sheet of your liking by using a macro. For instance, the following will insert, in the current document, the names of all the styles available in the document. Each style name is on its own line (paragraph) and is formatted using the various styles.

Sub ListStyleNames()
   For Each Style In ActiveDocument.Styles
       With Selection
           .Style = ActiveDocument.Styles(Style)
           .TypeText (ActiveDocument.Styles(Style).NameLocal)
           .TypeParagraph
       End With
   Next
End Sub

Such an approach, while handy for a concise list of styles, isn't much more informative than what can be printed using the "Styles" designation in the Print dialog box. It does, however, provide a basis upon which one can build to create a more full-featured style sheet.

The problem with creating a detailed style sheet using macros is that styles can contain a ton of information. The object model used by Word (and accessible in VBA) quickly becomes quite complex when testing styles to see what they contain. Here's just a simple example to give you the flavor:

Sub SimpleStyleSheet()
    Dim sOutput As String
    Dim sTemp As String
    Dim StyleTypes(4) As String

    StyleTypes(1) = "Paragraph"
    StyleTypes(2) = "Character"
    StyleTypes(3) = "Table"
    StyleTypes(4) = "List"

    For Each Style In ActiveDocument.Styles
        sOutput = Style.NameLocal & vbCrLf
        sOutput = sOutput & "   Style type: " & StyleTypes(Style.Type) & vbCrLf
        sTemp = Style.BaseStyle
        If Len(sTemp) > 0 Then
            sOutput = sOutput & "   Based on: " & Style.BaseStyle & vbCrLf
        End If
        sOutput = sOutput & "   Font: " & Style.Font.Name
        sTemp = ""
        If Style.Font.Bold Then sTemp = sTemp & "Bold, "
        If Style.Font.Italic Then sTemp = sTemp & "Italic, "
        If Len(sTemp) > 0 Then
            sTemp = Left(sTemp, Len(sTemp) - 2)
            sOutput = sOutput & " (" & sTemp & ")"
        End If
        sOutput = sOutput & vbCrLf
        Selection.TypeText (sOutput & vbCrLf)
    Next
End Sub

The only thing this macro does is to list all the styles, what type of styles they are, whether they are based on a different style (and if so, what that style is named), what font is used by the style, and whether the font is bold or italic. Anyone familiar with styles will immediately understand that these few items are only a small sampling of what can be defined within a style. To check all possible style formats and print them in the style sheet would make the macro very long, indeed.

Even so, this macro might be useful as it provides an idea of how to put together your own style sheet. You just need to figure out what you want to see in the style sheet and then add the macro code to determine that information and print it out.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (6748) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Printing a Full Style Sheet.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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