Changing a Toolbar Button Image

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 17, 2015)

Word provides you with quite a bit of flexibility in how your toolbars appear. You can change the appearance of your toolbar buttons so they accurately reflect how you want Word to appear. For instance, you may have added a custom macro to a toolbar, and you want to change it so that a graphic appears on the toolbar button instead of the macro name. You can make changes such as this by following these steps:

  1. Right-click your mouse on any toolbar visible in Word. Word displays a Context menu.
  2. Choose Customize from the Context menu. Word displays the Customize dialog box with the Toolbars tab selected. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Customize dialog box with the Toolbars tab selected.

  4. Right-click on the toolbar button you want to modify. Word displays a Context menu.
  5. Choose Change Button Image from the Context menu. Word displays a list of available graphic images you can use.
  6. Click on the graphic image you want to use. The image appears on the toolbar button.
  7. If you want to get rid of the text that appears on the toolbar button, continue with the next step, otherwise, skip to step 9.
  8. Right-click on the toolbar button you want to modify. Word displays a Context menu.
  9. Choose Default Style from the Context menu. The toolbar button changes to only an image.
  10. Click on Close to get rid of the Customize dialog box.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1822) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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