Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Understanding Strikethrough Formatting.

Understanding Strikethrough Formatting

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated January 12, 2015)

4

One of the character formats you can use within Word is referred to as Strikethrough. This simply means that Word shows a horizontal line through the middle of the character to which the attribute has been applied. Strikethrough can be applied either by clicking on the Strikethrough tool on the Formatting toolbar or by choosing the Strikethrough check box in any Font dialog box.

A typical use for characters being struck through is in relation to the Track Changes feature of Word. With Track Changes turned on (and displayed on the screen), characters that have been deleted are shown as struck through.

Actually Word has two types of strikethrough formatting. You can specify that something be struck through once or you can choose a double strikethrough. This latter character format, which uses two horizontal lines instead of one, must be applied from the Font dialog box. Simply make sure the Double Strikethrough check box is selected.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1431) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Understanding Strikethrough Formatting.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is 6 - 0?

2016-04-07 03:07:42

Meer Muhammad

How the Macros are recorded in Ms-Word?


2015-01-12 09:40:27

awyatt

Fred: Based on the on-screen choices you describe, it sounds like you have a ribbon-based version of Word. This particular tip is for the menu-based version of the software.

Read the final paragraph or the lead-in boxed information. It tells you what version this is for and directs you to a tip that is for the later versions (like yours) that use the ribbon interface.

-Allen


2015-01-10 16:27:06

Bill

You need to open the "Font" dialog box by clicking the Dialog Box Launcher arrow (the small square containing a diagonal arrow) in the Font section of the Home Tab of the Ribbon. "Double Strikethrough" is in the "Effects" section of the Font dialog box.


2015-01-10 09:52:27

Fred

Where is this? On the top of my screen I only see these choices: File, Home, Insert, Page Layout, References, Mailings, Review, View, & Add-in. I do not see anything called “Formatting” or “Font dialog”. We need instructions for rank dummies like me.


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