Setting Limit Line Spacing in the Equation Editor

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated May 23, 2015)

When using the Equation Editor, you can input summation and other types of equations that use limits. These limits may appear as characters either above or below the main body of the equation—there may even be additional limit lines. You can control the spacing the Equation Editor uses between multiple limit lines, where the spacing is defined as the distance between baselines for each limit line. The value you specify represents a percentage of the normal spacing that would otherwise be used. Thus, a value of 125% represents a spacing that is 25 percent larger than normal. You can set this adjustment through these steps:

  1. Choose Spacing from the Format menu. The Equation Editor displays the Spacing dialog box.
  2. Click on the Limit line spacing box (you will need to scroll down some in the list of spacing settings). The Equation Editor changes the Spacing dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Spacing dialog box.

  4. Enter a limit line spacing value as a percentage of normal.
  5. Click on OK.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (942) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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