Please Note: This article is written for users of the following Microsoft Word versions: 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. If you are using a later version (Word 2007 or later), this tip may not work for you. For a version of this tip written specifically for later versions of Word, click here: Making All Lines in a Paragraph the Same Height.

Making All Lines in a Paragraph the Same Height

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated August 15, 2015)

If you discover that all the lines in a paragraph do not appear to be the same height, it is probably because the line spacing option you are using for the paragraph is set incorrectly. If you use Auto line spacing (from the Paragraph formatting dialog box) for a paragraph, Word calculates what the largest letters are on the line, and then adjusts the line height (leading) to compensate for the character size. If the characters on one line are a bit larger than the characters on another line, then the lines in the paragraph appear to be spaced differently.

To overcome this potential problem, you should always use the Exactly setting for Line Spacing, and then specify a point size for the spacing. A good rule of thumb is to make the line spacing 120% of the font you are using in the paragraph. Thus, if you are using 10-point Times Roman, then you would set line spacing at exactly 12 points.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (163) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003. You can find a version of this tip for the ribbon interface of Word (Word 2007 and later) here: Making All Lines in a Paragraph the Same Height.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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